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                                                                                               Image result for nurse logo
     
     

     Welcome Back to the 2018-19 School Year!

     
     
              This is a reminder that as the kids are back in school, it is of upmost importance that we remember to review health tips to prevent the spread of illness and infection.
     
    Any temperature greater that 100.4 degrees F is considered a fever. Children must be fever free for 24 hours without using fever reducing medications (Tylenol, Motrin, Advil) in order to return to school. This applies even if the underlying cause of the fever is non-infectious, such as middle ear infections, bronchitis, urinary tract infections, etc.  Children with a fever do not usually feel well enough to participate and attend school. Please note that a child who exhibits symptoms of illness without a fever may be send home if the nurse feels this is in the best interest of the child or the child's classmates (without compromised immune systems).
     
    It is helpful in preventing the spread of illness if children learn to cough or sneeze into their sleeve or use tissues to cover sneezes and coughs, and wash hands after contact with the secretions. Any child who has been on antibiotic therapy for 24 hours is no longer considered infectious and may return to school. This includes infections of the eye, nose, skin and strep infections. (Exception is pink eye, not all doctors treat this, so the doctor or nurse will decide if exclusion is necessary to protect others from being contaminated).
     
    Children with diarrhea should remain home until they are symptom free for 24 hours. The only exception is if the diarrhea is the result of a chronic infection, then a note from the doctor is needed indicating the diarrhea is not infectious.
     
    A child who has vomited the evening before or in the morning before school should remain home for that day.
     
    If a child has Pertussis (whooping cough), Meningococcal disease or any other known untreatable contagious disease, they must be kept home until they are no longer contagious. For most common childhood diseases, the period of contagion is unknown.
     
    Please feel free to contact me for additional information anytime! 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                    
     
     
     
     
    End Of Year 2017/18
     
     
    Please remember to pick up any medications that your child may have in the health room by the end of this school year.  The medications can not be sent home with the child or stored at school over the Summer.
    If you are anticipating that your child/ren will have medications in school next year, please have your physician fill out and return the new medication administration form by the beginning of the 2018/19 school year. You can find most health forms on my website or you can go to the Queen Anne's County Public School website under school health.
    If you have any questions please call at Church Hill Elementary School at 410 556 6681.
     
     
     
     
     
    January 2016
     
    • Brrrrr...it is cold out there! Please make sure your child is dressed appropriately for this chilly weather by wearing a hat, mittens and a warm jacket.
    • The cold temperatures and the dry air indoors are causing a lot of dry and cracked lips. Please provide your child with Chapstick that he/she can keep in his/her backpack during school to stay moisturized. A bottle of water will help stay hydrated as well.
    • Also, if your phone numbers have changed please make sure to always update them with the school so we can reach you in case there is an illness or for emergencies.
     
     
     
      December 2015
     

    Here are a few of the common viruses that we may see in our school age population.  I wanted to point out the signs and symptoms so that you may be aware.  

     Fifth’s Disease

    • May have low fever
    • Bright red rash on the cheeks that gives a “slapped cheek” look, which fades and recurs.
    • Followed by a “lacy” rash on the trunk, arms and legs.  The rash lasts 3 to 7 days but may reappear over 1 to 3 weeks in response to environmental changes (e.g. sunlight, temperature, stress)
    • This illness is most transmissible before the onset of symptoms. 
    • After the appearance of the rash and other symptoms the individual is unlikely to be infectious.
    Treatment:
    There is NO specific treatment for fifth disease. Be supportive of your classmates.

     

    Strep Throat

    Symptoms:

    • Fever,
    • Red, swollen tonsils,
    • White patches in the throat,
    • Tender or swollen glands (lymph nodes) in the neck, and
    • Stomach pain.
    • Rash
    • These infections are common in school-age children, especially during the school year.

    The bacteria that cause strep throat (group A streptococcus) is spread by person to person contact with nasal secretions or saliva, often among family members. Sneezing, coughing, and shaking hands can spread the infection easily. If repeated cases of strep appear in your family, you might check to see if someone is a carrier. Carriers have strep in their throats, but the bacteria do not make them sick.

    Call your doctor if your child has strep throat symptoms. Antibiotics are prescribed to treat strep throat. Symptoms will likely go away by the second or third day.

     Remedies may ease a sore throat:

    • Provide plenty of liquids. Warm soups and hot chocolate along with cold drinks and popsicles may soothe a sore throat. Avoid orange juice, grapefruit juice, lemonade, and acidic drinks.
    • Gargle several times a day with warm salt water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in 1 cup water).
    • Use a cool-mist vaporizer or humidifier to moisten and soothe a sore throat.
    • Try over-the-counter pain medications, such as Children’s Motrin or Acetaminophen. Do NOT give aspirin to children.
    • Warm tea with honey

     You can help reduce the spread of strep throat and viruses.

    • Teach your children to wash their hands often with soap and water.
    • Keep sick children home for at least 24 hours after they no longer have a fever without using fever reducing drugs.
    • If your child is taking an antibiotic, they must be on it for 24 hours before returning to school.
    • Make sure your child finishes the entire dose of antibiotics as prescribed.
    • Do not send your child to school if they are sick.
    • Teach your children not to share personal items like drinks, food, utensils, napkins, towels and to cover their cough and sneezes with their elbow when a tissue is not available.
    • Discard your child’s toothbrush once the antibiotic treatment is started and replace it with a new one.
    • Keep your families’ toothbrushes and utensils separate until they have been washed.

     

    Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease (Coxsackievirus)
    • Mild viral disease caused by the Coxsackievirus

    Symptoms:

    • Fever
    • Sore throat
    • Stomach pain
    • Diarrhea
    • Rash of tiny blisters on the palms of hands, soles of the feet and in the mouth (lasting 7-10 days).
    Transmitted by direct contact with nose and throat discharges, feces of infected people (who may be symptomatic) and aerosol droplet spread.
    Person can be source of infection as long as the virus is shed in the stool, usually several weeks. It is contagious before symptoms begin.

     Mononucleosis (Mono)

    Acute viral syndrome caused by the Epstein-Barr virus.
    Symptoms:
    • Sore throat, 
    • Tiredness
    • Fever
    • Enlarged lymph nodes

    Very contagious! Most cases go away by themselves over 2-3 weeks. Transmitted from person to person through saliva. Can be spread between children by shared objects, or toys that have saliva on them.

     
     Upcoming
     
    Vision and Hearing re-screens are scheduled for December 12th. If your child fails either screen the parents will be notified.
     
    Vision and hearing screens are scheduled for the 8th, 9th and the 12th of October.
     
     
           
                                 Welcome Back!
     
    Dear Parents,

    I would like to extend a warm welcome to all students and their parents. I am looking forward to working with you and your children at Church Hill Elementary School during the 2015-2016 school year. To ensure your child’s health and safety, I would like to share a few items with you. 

     

    HEALTH CONCERNS:

    Please inform me of any severe allergies, surgeries, accidents or new health problems that occurred during the summer months or which may occur during the school year.

    MEDICATIONS

    If medications are to be administered in school, whether they are over the counter or prescription, they must be accompanied by a prescription from their primary care provider and a completed Maryland State School Medication Administration form from the parent or guardian giving permission for the medication to be taken at school. 

    All medications are to be brought in a properly labeled container labeled with the student’s name, name of the medication, dose and strength, and what it is being given for, time medication is to be given, and student’s grade. This applies to all medications, including those sold over the counter such as Tylenol (Acetaminophen) or Motrin and Advil (Ibuprofen). Parents must bring all medication to the school nurse. It is not appropriate for students to carry medications on the bus or in their backpacks.

    Please remember to pick up your child's medication by the last day of school. Medications will not be sent home with students.

    If you want your child to be able to receive discretionary medication while at school such as Tylenol, cough drops and cough syrup, a discretionary medication form must be completed and returned to me.  

    All medication forms are available on the school nurse home page under the links.

    IMMUNIZATIONS:

    The Maryland School Immunization Regulations require that ALL students entering Kindergarten must show proof of two varicella shots. Please work with your child's doctor to be sure they are all up to date before the school year begins. Written documentation of your child's shot records must be at the school before the first day of school in order for your child to be allowed to attend. He/She will be send home if this documentation is not provided. If you have any questions about which immunizations are required for school, please call your child's doctor, the school nurse or your local health department at 410-758-0720.

     ILLNESS/ABSENCES:

    Please contact the school office in the morning if your child is to be absent and inform them why he/she will not be attending. If your child has been ill, he/she should be free of a temperature for 24 hours before returning to school.

    If your child is diagnosed with any of the following communicable diseases please notify the nurse: strep throat, chicken pox, impetigo, scabies, head lice, pink eye, viral/diarrhea illness and Fifth’s Disease. The exclusion time for each is:

    Strep Throat and Impetigo – 24 hours after initial dose of antibiotic

    Chicken Pox – 7 days or until lesions are crusted over

    Scabies/Ringworm – 24 hours after initial of medication and an MD note

    Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis) – 24 hours after initial dose of medication

    Fifth’s Disease – exclusion at discretion of family MD or until fever subsides 

     

    WHEN SHOULD I KEEP MY CHILD HOME FROM SCHOOL?

     Students will be sent home from school or should be excluded from school for the following reasons:

     

     

    1.             Fever of 100.4 degrees and over - exclude until student has been fever-free for at least 24 hours
    2.              Rash of unknown origin (especially if accompanied by a fever).
    3.              Head injury.
    4.              Severe coughing or difficulty breathing.                                                                                                         
    5.              Colds - a child with thick or constant nasal discharge should remain home.
    6.             Diarrhea or vomiting - exclude until student has been symptom-free for at least 24 hours. 
    7.             Stiff neck associated with a fever and/or a recent injury.
    8.             Inadequate immunizations with known disease outbreak in school.   

     

     I hope this information is helpful to you. If I can be of any help throughout the year please don’t hesitate to call me at school 410-556-6681.

     Claire Gervais BSN RN

     
     
     
     
     
     It's Flu Season!

     

    Dear Parents,

    Common cold and influenza (flu) season are upon us. With a little diligence you can prevent your family members from getting sick this winter. The common cold and the flu are both viruses with many different strains. They are spread by being coughed or sneezed on by someone carrying the virus or by touching your mouth or nose after touching something with the virus on it such as doorknobs, tables, and other people's infected hands. Symptoms can range from mild runny noise and cough to body aches, fever, and chills. The flu is often distinguished by fever, body aches, and chills. The common cold does not usually make a person feel as "wiped out" as the flu. If you suspect that you or your child has the flu, call the doctor right away and explain the symptoms. The doctor will determine if there is a need to test for flu.

    Prevention methods include:

    • Frequent hand washing for 20 seconds with soap and warm water (or the use of an alcohol based hand sanitizer rubbed in until dry if soap and water are not available).
    • Vaccination - it is not too late to get a flu shot! Visit your local pharmacy or call your child's pediatrician for a flu shot today.
    • Stay away from people who are sick and limit exposure to high traffic public places. At the supermarket, use available hand wipes before leaving and wash hands thoroughly when you return home.
    • Keep your child home from school if he or she has a fever, vomiting, diarrhea, or uncontrolled cough. He should be free on any of these symptoms for at least 24 hours before returning to school.

     

    Feel free to call me if you have any questions or concerns 410-556-6681.
     
     
     
     

    WELCOME BACK TO THE SCHOOL 2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR!

     

    Welcome to the Church Hill Elementary School Health Office.

    Please keep me informed of any changes in your child's health or new medical conditions so I can best serve your child. I welcome parents to introduce themselves to me.

    This web site was created for teachers, parents and students.  It was designed to be informative and instructional, providing you with many health related resources.

     

    Special Announcements!
     
     
    STUDENT PHYSICALS
     
    A comprehensive physical examination to include state required immunizations is required for students entering Kindergarten and all new students to the county grades 1 through 4. 
     
    IMMUNIZATIONS
     
    Attention parents. There are new school immunization requirements for entry into Kindergarten.
     
    2nd VARICELLA VACCINATION
     
    Call your doctor to make sure your child is ready! 
     
    MEDICATIONS  
     

    If medications are to be administered in school, whether they are over the counter or prescription, they must be accompanied by a prescription from their primary care provider and a completed Maryland State School Medication Administration form from the parent or guardian giving permission for the medication to be taken at school. 

    All medications are to brought in a properly labeled container labeled with the student’s name, name of the medication, dose and strength, and what it is being given for, time medication is to be given, and student’s grade. This applies to all medications, including those sold over the counter such as Tylenol (Acetaminophen) or Motrin and Advil (Ibuprofen). Parents MUST bring medication to school nurse. It is not appropriate for students to carry medications on the bus or in their backpacks.

    Please remember to pick up your child's medication by the last day of school. Medications will not be sent home with students. 

     
    If you want your child to be able to receive discretionary medication while at school such as Tylenol, cough drops and cough syrup, a discretionary medication form must be completed and returned to the school nurse.  
     
     

     

    When Should I Keep My Child Home From School?

    Students will be sent home from school or should be excluded from school for the following reasons:

    1.  Fever of 100 degrees and over - exclude until student has been fever-free for at least 24 hours.
    2.  Conjunctivitis (pink eye), strep infections, ringworm and imetigo are all infections and must be treated with medication for a minimum  
         of  24 hours before returning to school. Please do not allow affected students back before this time so that other students are not   
         infected unnecessarily. 
    3.  Rash of unknown origin (especially if accompanied by a fever).
    4.  Head injury.
    5.  Severe coughing or difficulty breathing.                                                                                                         

    6.  Colds - a child with thick or constant nasal discharge should remain home. 

    7.  Diarrhea or vomiting - exclude until student has been symptom-free for at least 24 hours.
    8.  Stiff neck associated with a fever and/or a recent injury.
    9.  Inadequate immunizations with known disease outbreak in school.                                                            

     

     
     Remember the 24 Hour rule of thumb!  

    Return to school guidelines:


                                                       

    Students may return to school after the following:

    24 hours without temperature (and without taking fever reducing medications such as Tylenol or Advil/Motrin)

    24 hours without nausea, vomiting, diarrhea (and tolerating a normal diet)

    24 hours of receiving medication (such as antibiotics, eye ointments) 

    If your child still seems tired, pale, with little appetite, not tolerating solid foods, and generally "not him/herself", PLEASE do not send him/her to school.  Some viral illnesses may take longer before your child is well enough to return to school.